2014 NFHS High School Rule Changes

edited August 2013 in Rules & Officiating

image2014 NFHS High School Rule Changes

The NFHS rules committee came together and laid down the law. With so many new rule changes for 2014, Mark Donahue tries to make sense of it all.

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Comments

  • seems all good, eye black rule is a bit questionable but otherwise seems to streamline game mechanics and promote a clean style of play. Still think that NFHS head rules are counterintuitive and that they should play by the 3" throat rule as well (but not the 6" scoop).
    Michael AllenMark Donahue
  • Mark DonahueMark Donahue Video King! Boise, ID
    You're right, as an official I'll put my theoretical stripes on and act like the eyeblack rule will be enforced, but I really don't see that happening with any consistency anywhere in the country.
  • The defenseless position seems a little liberal from your description. Are HS players now immune to the hospital pass?
    Big lacrosse fan. Oxy '09 and former assistant with the Tigers.
  • Mark DonahueMark Donahue Video King! Boise, ID
    It's starting to look like that @Cam we just don't know yet. It's up for interpretation but IMHO there are many hits that will be unavoidable and as long as they are low, in front, and the hands are together I'm good with it. I hope this only applies to the guys that never saw it coming, as a defenseman I hate to see it go, but as a human I support just about anything that is promoting a safer sport.
  • Just to be clear the wording in the press release regarding the second foul by the defense is only applied during the last two minutes of play: "Rule 7-8-2k: During a Flag Down situation (Slow Whistle), the officials will now stop play to enforce penalties on a second defensive foul 'during the final two minutes of regulation play with the team that is ahead and possessing the ball in the goal/attack area, unless a scoring play is imminent.'"

    I'd like to know if we're supposed to treat illegal eye black as a uniform violation. I can't imagine it would be penalized further than losing the opening face, but I do want that ironed out before the season and I'm sure it will be.

    The added emphasis on a defenseless player, which I'm sure will be added to the POEs, is a good idea but it comes with a lot of additional training for both officials and coaches. Simply put, what was a perfectly legal body check last year might not be the case this year if the official judges that the player getting hit couldn't see it coming.

    The other big one is the change of when the official's authority begins. Now it is the "immediate playing facility," instead of just stepping onto the field of play. Certainly helps out when dealing with any pre/post-game conduct issues.

    Big supporter of the no horns and the bigger box. It makes for a faster game but two-man crews are going to be doing more running as a result.
  • socolax2socolax2 CT's finest
    edited August 2013
    Personally I don't think the pinch makes any difference at the college level. I say let the kids have the pinched heads.

    Frankly I am annoyed by all of the head and stringing changes. Why?

    Because it is insulting. The people making the rules are basically saying that pinched heads and bagged out pockets are the reason we're good at lacrosse. You can give me a traditional M1 with a flip grip or triax, and I can still carry the ball through an onslaught of defenders and push my way right to the cage because I am a large man with good stick skills that I practiced to get. Why are you going to punish these kids hours of wall ball and training by making it easy to get the ball out? For safety? I'm sorry but the game has gotten too big, too strong, and too fast for the game to be played the way it was in the 70s. Gone are the days of run and gun and quick release passes and takeaway checks. Kids in HS are 6'4, 220 lbs, and run like gazelles. Arm that kid with good stick skills and he can dodge through an entire team, whether you like it or not. And coaches are not going to change their philosophies because the likes of Quint and the good ol' boys want the game to go back to being the game they played. Not to mention that great stringers are just going to find ways to keep the stick having the same hold they want. I can play with a mesh pocket with no shooters, have it be totally legal, and still have it hold the way refs don't want it to.

    Has it occurred to anybody that perhaps we like the game we are playing and don't want it changed?
    Post edited by socolax2 on
    All opinions are my own unless otherwise stated.
    Connor WilsontriggertravRyan Mulvaneydfongejackmish
  • socolax2socolax2 CT's finest
    edited August 2013


    If you can do the same thing with an M1 that you can do with a pinched bag, why are you complaining?

    Most of the kids I see today can NOT play with a wide head or shallow pocket. Their skills are simply not good enough. Sure, some are, and they practice a lot to get there. Shouldn't they be rewarded for that? The 6'4" athlete with a shallow pocket and wide head can not dodge through a defense. I see it in NYC all the time. The 6'4 kid with a big bag can do it easily. Are we just rewarding kids for being big now? It's all about skill, always has been. If the 6'4 kid works on his skills, then he is Mark Matthews, and not just an athlete who can bull dodge people with a bag.

    The game doesn't have to be played like it was in the 70s, but is one guy dodging through 3 people for EVERY SINGLE GOAL exciting to you? That sounds boring to me.

    You say "arm that kid with good stick skills" exactly... but don't arm him with a pinched bag that lets him do it with lower skills.

    If the heads are wider, coaches WILL change their philosophies because they will HAVE to.

    On your stringing point, I firmly disagree. Low, V and U shooters in HS legal sticks make it impossible to dislodge the ball, but it passes the tests. I have seen easily 100 college legal sticks this last year, and not a SINGLE college legal pocket yet comes close to that.

    I'm complaining because, and I am glad you brought this up, I don't think that the game should constantly be tweaked for the sake of viewership, ESPECIALLY at the HS level. HS lacrosse isn't about watching the game. No, I don't think a guy dodging through 3 people is exciting every time. But should we alter the game because "wahh, I don't like watching johnny play this way"? I think its ridiculous that we're changing the landscape for kids every season to have to adjust to. To me that is like going into HS football and saying "Guys, you're not allowed to use gloves to catch anymore, you have to play uptempo every play, and no more huddles, and though Johnny is a great athlete at QB, he isn't allowed to scramble any more, he has to throw the ball and may not use his athleticism to be successful." Then coming back and saying the next season "OK, you can use gloves, and Johnny QB can scramble again, but now you're only allowed to run the ball X amount of times in a game." I don't like artificially manufacturing transition. Those changes were made in the college game because it was slowing the game down and people were whining about it, but maybe some of us like watching defensive battles? And in HS I am OK with a kid getting a learning curve with a pinched head.

    I guess what I am trying to say here is, for something that doesn't make as much difference as what everyone is fussing over, just let it be. I know that if I can take a college head (we'll say an exo X for arguments sake) and can give it a pocket where its impossible for me to lose the ball, and I'm no Mark Matthews, and I don't think I am particularly special at stringing, that these kids can find ways (and do find ways) to string a head like that without losing the ball. And you say what you want but there are HS kids using college heads (in prep for college) and as long as they have strung it to have a nice channel and a reasonable depth, the ball stays. I have seen it all over Fairfield and New Haven County.

    As long as the culture behind club ball exists, kids are going to find a way to be superman because they need to be for those college coaches at showcases, and those coaches aren't going to coach differently because its in their best interest monetarily and reputation of club name wise, they need those kids to go play college lacrosse. I don't think its necessarily a bad thing at this stage of the game.
    Post edited by socolax2 on
    All opinions are my own unless otherwise stated.
  • @socolax2, take a look at these videos of the 1989 National Championship game between SU and JHU:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgPYLMN92pI&feature=related

    You see, the rule changes aren't "manufacturing transition" or being "tweaked for the sake of viewership." They're attempts to bring the game back to its roots after being, quite literally, manufactured into the slow, 1-on-all, dodge-and-shoot version we've had for over a decade.

    Watch the Gaits and T. Marechek get stripped or drop the ball half the time they're holding it, and you start to realize what these insanely pinched sticks and black-hole pockets have done to lacrosse. (And you say you like watching defensive battles? Even if they're always losing?)

    And the passing in that '89 game is like freaggin' pinball. I think it's fine if fans enjoy seeing Rabil run through six people over and over again; Paul Gait did the same thing a few times in this game. But he could also throw a quickstick, and when you show fans how guys like him used to play, they realize they're sorely missing out.
    socolax2Mark DonahuetriggertravRyan Mulvaney
  • socolax2socolax2 CT's finest
    edited August 2013
    In the college game, I'm with you. In the HS game, I don't think they're at a talent point where instituting the same rules as college will make a large difference. I feel like most people who have played the game for 10-15+ years have the necessary skills to play with just about anything you hand them. I think in a place where the game is exploding, if you take away the pinch and make kids who are learning the game worse at it than they already are (say Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, etc.) that you're handicapping them. I mean yes, it is an artificial boost in a sense, but in the other sense those kids have to work harder to be able to catch and throw with that pinch, when they changed the rule in 2010 I went from a Deuce (most pinched head on the market, probably ever) to the Clutch X which was pretty wide, threw a trad in it, and the only difference was my catching was better. I could still handle the ball the same. I had no Us or Vs, just 2 straight laces and a nylon up top. I'm not saying I am by any means a great lacrosse player or anything, I am saying if I can do it, then where it counts with the all state and all american players going to college, they can do it too. And those level of guys are already using college heads and string jobs. All this rule is gonna do is take away the curve for kids who need it.

    I get very annoyed that the rules committees decisions are based on the needs of the top 10 programs and the rest of us are left to suffer. In elite D1 ball, yeah these changes are necessary because of Paul Rabil & Co. But on JV and mediocre varsity HS teams? let the kids play with what they want head and string wise. One of the big draws of this sport is the customization allowed to your stick and head, it becomes a part of you, and forgive me for not wanting to take that away from kids who are currently getting into the sport, even if it means a couple of kids want to pinch their sticks.
    Post edited by socolax2 on
    All opinions are my own unless otherwise stated.
    triggertravRyan Mulvaney
  • edited August 2013
    socolax2 said:

    In the college game, I'm with you. In the HS game, I don't think they're at a talent point where instituting the same rules as college will make a large difference. I feel like most people who have played the game for 10-15+ years have the necessary skills to play with just about anything you hand them. I think in a place where the game is exploding, if you take away the pinch and make kids who are learning the game worse at it than they already are (say Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, etc.) that you're handicapping them. I mean yes, it is an artificial boost in a sense, but in the other sense those kids have to work harder to be able to catch and throw with that pinch, when they changed the rule in 2010 I went from a Deuce (most pinched head on the market, probably ever) to the Clutch X which was pretty wide, threw a trad in it, and the only difference was my catching was better. I could still handle the ball the same. I had no Us or Vs, just 2 straight laces and a nylon up top. I'm not saying I am by any means a great lacrosse player or anything, I am saying if I can do it, then where it counts with the all state and all american players going to college, they can do it too. And those level of guys are already using college heads and string jobs. All this rule is gonna do is take away the curve for kids who need it.

    I get very annoyed that the rules committees decisions are based on the needs of the top 10 programs and the rest of us are left to suffer. In elite D1 ball, yeah these changes are necessary because of Paul Rabil & Co. But on JV and mediocre varsity HS teams? let the kids play with what they want head and string wise. One of the big draws of this sport is the customization allowed to your stick and head, it becomes a part of you, and forgive me for not wanting to take that away from kids who are currently getting into the sport, even if it means a couple of kids want to pinch their sticks.

    I don't think anyone is really suffering from these rule changes, as being more in line with college rules will make for a much easier transition for players moving into the next level.

    Also if there are people who need these pinched heads to perform and can't compete while using college legal heads, then shouldn't the focus be on introducing them to the type of equipment that they will HAVE to play with later in their lacrosse career? I have given a few kids I coached at a camp some universal heads with college legal stringing and saw a DRASTIC improvement in their fundamentals. The pinched heads only encourage bad technique that will not allow them to progress and become better lacrosse players later in life.

    Starting with this strong foundation and having an even playing field in regards to the rules will only benefit them in the long run. In regards to younger players not having the necessary skills to play with these regulations, I can definitely say that I've met kids that are half my age (I'm only 20) that are far better than I was at the end of my high school career when looking at their stick skills. And yes many of them have gotten rid of the U's and V's to adopt college legal stringing. To say that they are being handicapped by having them abide by college rules is in my mind a bit short-sighted. I mean shouldn't we be pushing our players to become better? Or did I miss something?
    Post edited by triggertrav on
    Mark DonahuethebuckethelmetRyan Mulvaneyjackmish
  • Ryan MulvaneyRyan Mulvaney Supreme Overlord Caldwell, ID
    It seems like the biggest debate for rule changes to the HS level have to do with sticks. I love that the rules are changing to promote a safer sport because we all have heard "safety first." I really don't want to weigh in on the stick debate because I have done so quite a few times already, but I do have to say the biggest thing the rule changes are doing is preparing kids for a smoother transition to the college level. Whether it's NCAA DI, DII, and DIII or MCLA DI and DII, the need for a smooth transition is essential. You can't have kids trying to learn proper stick skills because their high school setup prevented them from taking their game to the next level. Shallow pockets and higher shooters teach kids the importance of proper technique for ball control. I've seen too many high school kids with horrible technique on the field but their stick saves them every single time. It's extremely disheartening.
    #YoteFam
    #GrowTheGame
    #StringYourOwn
    #StringItForward

    College of Idaho Lacrosse
    Midfield
    Class of 2015
    jackmish
  • jackmishjackmish Durham, NC
    I know I already commented once, but a little after my comment the other commenters got to talking sticks, and I just can't keep myself out of that kind of conversation.

    I think @Rydensaur and @triggertrav are 100% correct. There is a great disadvantage to not using NCAA legal stringing at the HS level. If your ambitious like me and want to play at the college level, regardless of the Division its incredibly important. I got to know a past player at my High School named Cam Lewis who currently plays at W&L. He and I coached our school's camp and he came and played in our summer league games. He said it would be useful to adapt earlier, it wasn't terrible for him, he didn't use a lot of U's in HS. But the saying goes "adapt or die", what player at our age wouldn't want to have a leg up on against his more stubborn opponents coming out of High School? I can't imagine very many.

    The whole idea that we should let kids in High School use what they want because they need to learn first or their at a disadvantage if their forced to switch is a flawed argument. Everyone who sticks with their HS level stringing or even head, will have to switch when they graduate and possibly move on to college level anyway. Would you argue that we are disadvantaging all new college players with the NCAA's rules? Probably not. I myself as I have said before use NCAA stringing, I use a Clutch and Super Power at the moment and I'm considering switching to a Clutch X before my sophomore season. If any college players here recommend using Universal heads in HS let me know.
    #stringyourown

    Grow the Game
    Mark Donahue
  • As a faceoff guy, of course we use the tape on the head to our advantage, but so does everyone else. if everyone has tape on the head or their hand on the plastic there is no advantage.With the one loop hole pointed out "The only excuse you could have for tape there is the hole in your head doesn’t match the one in the shaft" I can tell you I'll just flip my shaft over and not use a screw. I don't think its a necessary rule change
    Ryan Mulvaney
  • Ryan MulvaneyRyan Mulvaney Supreme Overlord Caldwell, ID

    As a faceoff guy, of course we use the tape on the head to our advantage, but so does everyone else. if everyone has tape on the head or their hand on the plastic there is no advantage.With the one loop hole pointed out "The only excuse you could have for tape there is the hole in your head doesn’t match the one in the shaft" I can tell you I'll just flip my shaft over and not use a screw. I don't think its a necessary rule change

    Saying that everyone who takes a faceoff uses tape on their head or puts their hand on the plastic is a huge fallacy. I know tons of faceoff guys who are amazing and they don't do either of those things. Using tape on your head or touching the plastic on a faceoff is basically saying you're not as good as the guy you're going up against so you need something extra to get you on the same level as they are. Instead of using these practices as a crutch to win faceoffs, get out there and practice on developing hand speed, getting more leverage by using your body, or finding new techniques to win faceoffs. If the rule is being changed, then there is definitely something wrong going on on the lacrosse field.
    #YoteFam
    #GrowTheGame
    #StringYourOwn
    #StringItForward

    College of Idaho Lacrosse
    Midfield
    Class of 2015
    jackmish
  • socolax2socolax2 CT's finest
    Rydensaur, I don't know if you're a face off guy or not, but among face off men across the country there is a commonality that if you're not cheating, you're not trying. I have spoken to many people about this topic, and the overall opinion I have heard is to let the guys play. I spoke to a ref after a college game regarding what I do as a face off man (I grab the ball 90% of the time and have been called for it exactly once in my career of taking faceoffs, and it wasn't this game) and here's what one ref thought, though this obviously isn't an official statement of any kind just a post game convo I had:

    "The face off game is the most interesting aspect of lacrosse in my opinion. I know that there is something illegal going on every play, but you can only call what you see and what you know. If you're a guy who is able to grab the ball and throw it forward every play, making it appear as if your stick is doing all of the work, without any of us knowing, it should be a part of the game. To have hands that quick and to be able to do something like that is special and has a place. It would be easier for us as officials to open up the parameters of what is OK on a faceoff, because at this point if you're a guy taking them, you know the tricks and moves going on and know if the other guy is cheating more often than not, more than we do. What ends up happening with the rules changes is we end up slowing the faceoff down with long drawn out tie ups, and lose the speed of the game."

    All of these changes with tape, and color aid the ref in seeing what is going on, but at the end of the day if you want to cheat on a faceoff you're going to be able to do that. A kid with quick hands, and some knowledge, can punch your stick out of the way (making it look like a topping move) grab the ball, and throw it forward (making it look like he is using his stick to rake it forward) in the blink of an eye. I have even done this after the guy beat me to the clamp and took the ball right out of the back of his stick without him or the official noticing. When you have the audacity to do whatever you want on a faceoff, people don't even think twice about it. I am obviously OK with cheating on faceoffs. Like the official I spoke with said, if you can do something like that without getting caught, power to you. As long as the face off game is the way it is, I think that people will continue to do what they want down there, and instead of trying to bind everyone and ruin what is a really great part of the game, let people play with the knowledge that this is going on. I agree with the guy you're responding to, let them use the tape on the head and let everyone grab plastic.

    By allowing everyone to grab the plastic you're leveling the playing field and taking power away from those of us who would employ those tactics regardless of the rule. Making it a rule that you cannot is only going to deter the law abiding citizen. I am going to grab plastic and grab the ball every time, saying I can't isn't going to stop me, hasn't stopped me in the past. All you do by saying you can't is punish the people who don't have that audacity to begin with, thus making it easier for me to do what I do.

    I am sure many of you disagree with this, and more think this messes with the integrity of the game, and that is fine but it won't change my opinion on it.
    All opinions are my own unless otherwise stated.
    Ryan Mulvaneytriggertrav
  • Ryan MulvaneyRyan Mulvaney Supreme Overlord Caldwell, ID
    @socolax2 That's the mentality that is going to ruin future generations of lacrosse players. I grew up playing on a team that followed every rule. We knew there were tons of guys on other teams finding little ways to get the upper hand on the field but we never stooped to their level. We made up for it with hard work, dedication, and the right kind of thinking. You're advocating for HS kids to cheat effectively and cheat often because it works. You can continue to think the way you do about the rules, but they are in place for a reason. I'm going to stick with what I learned growing up and continue to pass that on to future generations of players. Don't cheat. Simple as that. To be effective ambassadors for the sport we need to lead by example.
    #YoteFam
    #GrowTheGame
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    College of Idaho Lacrosse
    Midfield
    Class of 2015
    jackmishtriggertrav
  • Rydensaur, In season I'm not on the plastic or really ever cheating. But all summer fall and winter anything goes at the x and its so much more fun. As faceoff guys we get it, its fun to just try new things and just play the game and we don't get mad at each other its just flow of the game. If my opponent cheats in a cool way in fall ball, chances are ill try the same thing next faceoff. Its like a crease dive or selling a push or anything, its fun and part of the game. I'm not soliciting cheating, grabbing the ball or the other guys stick in game isnt the best way, but tape and plastic is not a big deal especially if both guys do it. Lacrosse is supposed to be fun, and that's why I faceoff, because its a blast. Let us play our game
  • P.S. when I practice I have no tape and I'm off the plastic, all speed and skill
  • Ryan MulvaneyRyan Mulvaney Supreme Overlord Caldwell, ID
    @bringbackheadtape You say that it's all in fun when not in season, but that's not the case. The HS kids I've coached absolutely hate when someone bends or breaks the rules at the x. You can make a huge defense for it being off season and it should be fun, but you shouldn't generalize that everyone is that way. A lot of kids use the off season to get better and if someone is cheating it really throws them off. I've seen a lot of kids move away from taking face offs because of all the "tricks" that guys use. It's not a good environment to have kids learning in when players are pushing the boundaries on breaking rules rather than abiding by them.
    #YoteFam
    #GrowTheGame
    #StringYourOwn
    #StringItForward

    College of Idaho Lacrosse
    Midfield
    Class of 2015
  • socolax2socolax2 CT's finest
    I'm not saying kids should cheat, I am saying open the rules up to give the kids who aren't cheating a chance. Not to make a crazy analogy here but its like gun control. There are plenty of anti-gun advocates but the criminals are going to use them regardless of if you tell them not to. So instead of disarming the people who can protect themselves, let everyone use them.

    Let the kids grab plastic and use tape on their heads. The people making the rules are looking for ways to speed up the game (and the faceoff) well this is a way to do it. It will also make official's job easier in a time where we keep putting things in officials hands and keep giving them tough decisions.
    All opinions are my own unless otherwise stated.
  • Ryan MulvaneyRyan Mulvaney Supreme Overlord Caldwell, ID
    @socolax2 I can see where you're coming from about giving the kids who aren't cheating a chance. It's extremely frustrating to be beat every single time on a faceoff, especially more so when the other person is cheating, but by opening up the rules to allow these practices that are seen as cheating is basically saying "Hey you guys that have been cheating forever, you beat us. There is no way other kids can compete with you in an honest way so we're gonna allow everyone to do the same thing you've been doing." It's rewarding negative behaviors and it further perpetuates the idea that we are condoning cheating on the lacrosse fields.
    #YoteFam
    #GrowTheGame
    #StringYourOwn
    #StringItForward

    College of Idaho Lacrosse
    Midfield
    Class of 2015
  • elmoximelmoxim Hopedale, MA
    I have to jump in because this whole conversation has turned embarrassing! Different situation, same topic...my 10 year old Son's U11 team went to the Stowe VT tournament this past summer and played almost ALL of his games against U11 teams LOADED with kids too old to be playing U11! How do I know? Because my Son would ask these kids how old they were...he played attack one game against a goalie and a long pole who were both 14!! (if you have kids, the growth at ages 12-13-14 is amazing)

    So, PLEASE all of you who are arguing that rules are just "suggestions", or "summer doesn't count", or "if you ain't cheating you ain't tryin", PLEASE come to Hopedale and tell Blake, who works on his craft constantly and who's ability to compete on a level playing field and "best man wins" was taken from him, to suck it up and next time "be 14" because everybody does it! I will even meet you where it's convenient for you! Look him dead in his eyes and use the arguments you are using here to prove your point...

    The sport we all love is going through a growth spurt, and it is up to us to police it and there HAS to be honor among thieves! If you coach your team to cheat at the X, or turn a blind eye to illegal pockets and come to my school and beat us, then prepare to be ridiculed out loud by me...enjoy your victory Coach, you sure earned it! Have a beer and sleep like a baby knowing you are the best coach here today and you were able to beat us by going man against man! Or not!!...

    Some forget, we are charged with coaching boys/young men/men and it is not our job to teach cutting corners, or "by whatever means necessary". Those who are coaches, we are building better humans "through" lacrosse and everything they hear from us becomes who they are as men...remember that.

    E

    PS I think stick rule changes is a way to make people buy new gear because they now "can't " use the stick/pocket they already paid for, but that's just me.

    I also think that HS and younger kids I see can't handle the technology they are allowed to use! I can go to any field in the North East and point to a kid with $100 Rabil HS head with a high pocket and high whip...that kid will be practicing his toe drags on the sideline (because the ball CAN'T come out, not because he's good at toe drags!) . That same kid in the game can't throw a pass farther that 8 yards and will miss a lacrosse net entirely (probably shooting sidearm) that is 36 sq feet! Is that helping them become better lacrosse players?! That is a rhetorical question, the answer is no.

    And to the kid who is bigger and faster than everyone else, have fun with your dodges because when you move up and EVERYONE is big and fast, you will realize you forgot to become a "lacrosse player". To the coach who runs the offense through that one kid, take a minute to tell the other 5 kids on your offense that you have no time or interest in developing their skills or building a team offense, but they should be lucky they get to watch "Big Jimmy" score all those goals!

    PPS Sorry, this turned from response length to blog post length.
    Ryan Mulvaneyjackmishtriggertrav
  • Ryan MulvaneyRyan Mulvaney Supreme Overlord Caldwell, ID
    @elmoxim Very well said. Thank you.
    #YoteFam
    #GrowTheGame
    #StringYourOwn
    #StringItForward

    College of Idaho Lacrosse
    Midfield
    Class of 2015
  • jackmishjackmish Durham, NC
    edited September 2013
    @elmoxim agreed, this is the bane of my existence coaching and playing lacrosse, its painful to watch kids with the expensive stuff or the naturally big kids beat up the smaller ones. Anyone who argues that HS players aren't good enough yet to adopt NCAA rules, and too bad to play with class doesn't realize that a freshman in college playing isn't even a year older than a HS senior. Dedication is better than natural ability. Your son sounds like he'll be really good one day and will get respect on the field, for all the right reasons.
    Post edited by jackmish on
    #stringyourown

    Grow the Game
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