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Should High School Players use NCAA stringing regulations?

I was restringing a head that was badly in need of a new string-job this morning and I strung it with NCAA legal stringing. I've been doing this with all my heads and a lot of my customers for that last year after the new rules were enacted and I really haven't noticed a disadvantage whatsoever. Yeah I had to adjust how I strung the pocket itself for customers who preferred more whip than I (I use very little, I like being able to snap my wrists completely). But it wasn't a difficult change.

What do you think about younger players going by the NCAA rules? I do use HS legal heads and I don't think thats something younger players need to worry about as much. I do use a Super Power occasionally but I still love the Clutch. I think for players like myself who want to play at the collegiate level one day its not a bad idea. I don't think that that high schools should impose the rules mostly because not everyone strings for themselves.

The pictures below are of a HS Surgeon strung NCAA legal.

photo 1.JPG
2592 x 1936 - 2M
photo 2.JPG
2592 x 1936 - 2M
photo 4.JPG
2592 x 1936 - 2M
photo 3.JPG
2592 x 1936 - 2M
rawrawman48

Comments

  • jackmishjackmish Durham, NC
    @stringershack That's awesome! I help coach both a first/second team and one thing I wish companies who sell starter sticks would do would be to not use V's in those factory strung heads. NCAA legal is great because most sticks strung that way tend to have less whip than those with the badly hooking U's and V's.
    Mark Donahuerawrawman48
  • jackmish said:

    @stringershack That's awesome! I help coach both a first/second team and one thing I wish companies who sell starter sticks would do would be to not use V's in those factory strung heads. NCAA legal is great because most sticks strung that way tend to have less whip than those with the badly hooking U's and V's.

    I wish they would string them with pockets, but then again all the stringers would be out of work. I always
    try to help the parents get something a little better than "starter". My boys first stick was a Blade 2.0 with one of my old TI shafts, not a bad stick for a 5 year old. I would love it if they would agree on one head size, college or universal and universal stringing regulations.

  • Ryan MulvaneyRyan Mulvaney Supreme Overlord Caldwell, ID
    I'm stringing up a head for one of the kids I coached this summer. I let him use my stick for the last 4 games he played and he fell in love with it. High/mid pita pocket with two straight shooters. It was amazing at the improvements he had during the game because he wasn't using his own stick. U's and V's are absolute killers of furthering stick skills. There needs to be one set of rules across all levels to help prepare kids for the future.
    thebuckethelmetjackmish
  • I don't necessarily care if they change the rules, but I'd strongly encourage high school players to take up more simple pockets anyway. In my experience, players who learn with/use pockets like this seem to have more versatile stick skills. Their pockets--and I think @jackmish 's pictures execute this to perfection--allow the player, not the pocket, to dictate the stick's release point, especially on shots. One of the best attackmen I ever faced used a simple bag with one nylon across the top. He could let it fly whenever and from wherever he wanted; shooting drills against him were not fun.

    Fewer shooting strings can actually make a better, more natural pocket if the mesh is strung the right way. By definition, the more shooters you have, the more "artificial" your pocket is--it relies on the shooter setup rather than the mesh formation to create the feel of the pocket. On the other hand, fewer shooters lead to a more fluid, more natural, and quicker release while still allowing the pocket to "swing" with the ball.
    jackmishtriggertrav
  • Kevin RowenKevin Rowen LAS Editorial Intern SoCal
    I have a very simple outlook on this matter: if you're going to have to switch to NCAA stringing style eventually, you might as well get used to it sooner rather than later, since the "advantages" of having Vs and Us etc. aren't all that great anyway.
    jackmish
  • jackmishjackmish Durham, NC
    edited August 2013
    @krowen I agree 100%. Once I learned to string years ago I realized I can make an even better a channel for myself or someone else that would benefit a lot more than a tight U. Once I got good enough I kind of felt like using U's and V's are like training wheels almost for stringers.

    They also in a lot of cases cause inconsistency in pockets, in my opinion its easier, not just for an experienced stringer, to make a tight, consistent channel, than a tight, consistent shooting string. Thats also a big reason I like higher up straight shooters, being up at the top of the channel, the mesh is flatter and much easier to string so the shooter is strung well and consistently.
    Post edited by jackmish on
  • From my own personal experience, I've found that there is remarkable improvement in fundamentals for young developing players that are using college stringing without the U's or V's. I find the U's and V's to be more detrimental than anything as @jackmish said creating a consistent shooting string is more difficult than creating a consistent channel. I hope that NFHS adopts these rule changes in the near future so younger players are exposed to the same equipment regulations they will possibly experience later on in their lacrosse career, rather than playing with something for a very long time then having to suddenly change and adapt to new rules.
    jackmish
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